Landlords warn eviction ban bill would lead to foreclosures, slums

A bill that would halt evictions and freeze rents for a year after Gov. Charlie Baker lifts the coronavirus state of emergency has cleared its first major hurdle but faces staunch opposition from landlords who say it would lead to foreclosures, slums and worse.

“The further people get behind in their rent, the less likely they will ever be able to pay it. If we don’t deal with this problem and we wait another year, there’s a lot of money that will never get paid,” said Greg Vasil, CEO and president of the Greater Boston Real Estate Board. “It’s the property owners who lose. We’ll see foreclosures and properties will start to fall into disrepair.”

The eviction protection bill cleared the Joint Committee on Housing in a 14-3 party-line vote on Thursday. Proponents say the bill aims to keep tenants in their home after losing jobs due to the pandemic.

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Housing activists march to Baker’s home to push bill

BOSTON (AP) — Housing activists marched to Gov. Charlie Baker’s home in Swampscott on Wednesday to call on him to support more robust protections against evictions and foreclosures during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

About 100 to 150 protesters said the Republican governor and Democratic leaders in the Massachusetts Legislature need to back a comprehensive eviction prevention measure intended to help stabilize renters, homeowners and small landlords for a year as Massachusetts weathers the ongoing crisis.

The bill would ensure tenants cannot be evicted because of missed rent if the nonpayment was because of COVID-19, giving them time to get owed rental payments and other assistance in place.

It would also prevent “no fault” evictions and rent increases for 12 months following the state of emergency, guard against foreclosure and strengthen forbearance protections, allowing homeowners and landlords with up to 15 units to pause their mortgage and put missed payments on

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Lower Your Property Tax Bill – A New Year's Resolution You Can Keep

For many, the beginning of a new year signals a time to make some sort of change in their lives and become more like their ideal selves. For others, January signals the time to make a different kind of change, one that is much easier to make: trimming their property tax bill. The tax appeal process in New Jersey involves a number of steps and using an experienced property tax attorney to lead you through the process will make that New Year's resolution much easier to keep.

Since tax appeal season in New Jersey is toward the beginning of the year, lowering your property taxes is a perfect New Year's resolution. Toward the end of January of each year, every New Jersey property owner is supposed to receive their annual assessment. That's the little green card that comes from the tax assessor's office. Since all properties within a particular municipality … Read More