3,214 coronavirus patient deaths to date in Ohio nursing homes, other long-term care facilities

CLEVELAND, Ohio – At least 3,214 patients of Ohio nursing homes and other long-term care facilities have died with coronavirus this year, with 45 new deaths reported in the weekly update Wednesday night by the Ohio Department of Health.

This means that 62.4% of the 5,149 coronavirus deaths reported by the state by the state have involved such patients.

But the share has been shrinking over recent months. At the end of May, the patients at the facilities accounted for 70.5% of Ohio’s deaths. Since the beginning of September, the share has been 52.8%

The state releases updates for deaths by county, and cases by facility each Wednesday. Scroll to the bottom of this story to see a chart showing the reported case details by facility.

The state began tracking nursing home cases by facility on April 15. There have been 15,091 patient cases and 9,251 staff cases since then.

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Glaring Gap Between Vit D Guidance and Practice in Care Homes

Vitamin D supplementation in elderly care home residents is largely viewed as a “medicine” rather than a protective nutrient, risking vitamin D deficiency in this particularly vulnerable population, say British public health scientists.

Writing in BMJ Nutrition Prevention & Health, they stress an urgent review is needed of the nutritional guidelines and regulations in England on the use of the vitamin in elderly residential care homes.

Vitamin D supplementation “needs a professional separation from medicine and reframing as a matter of public health nutrition as well as a medical responsibility,” emphasizes Joe Williams, MSc Public Health graduate, Brighton University, UK, and colleagues.

The findings reveal “both a failure to implement evidence-based recommendations and a social injustice in urgent need of public health advocacy and resolution,” they emphasize.

For 30 years, vitamin D 10 µg as a daily supplement has been endorsed for care home residents. In 2016, the recommendations

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Ford Government’s New Legislation Will Make It Significantly Harder to Hold For-Profit Long-Term Care Homes Liable for COVID-19 Harms

TORONTO, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Ford government has introduced legislation that would make it significantly harder for residents and families to hold long-term care homes liable for harm resulting from exposure to and infection with COVID-19. The legislation covers any individual, corporation or entity and includes the crown (which means the government and its agencies).

Bill 218, which was both introduced in the Ontario Legislature by the Ford government and passed First Reading yesterday, is retroactive to March 17, 2020 meaning the legal rights of those who were infected, potentially infected or exposed to coronavirus on or after March 17, 2020 will be compromised by the legislation, if it is passed, no matter when they started any legal actions. There will be no compensation or relief for plaintiffs as a result of having their rights extinguished under this bill. The major changes in the legislation are as

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An Ethereum VR Game Featuring Atari and Care Bears Sells Plots of Virtual Land for $76K

A great number of Non-fungible tokens (NFTs) have been selling on various marketplaces this year creating tens of thousands of dollars in NFT sales. One particular platform called The Sandbox has been selling virtual land parcels for thousands of dollars worth of ether. The Sandbox is a virtual world that lets players create and own blockchain-backed virtual items in the metaverse built on the Ethereum network. On October 18, Sandbox revealed two 6×6 estates had been sold for 210 ether ($76,931) or 28x the original price.

In the future, digital currencies will be an integral part of the online world individuals call the “Metaverse.” The Metaverse is essentially a persistent virtual space converged with virtual reality. Current blockchain applications allow people to not only create 3D virtual spaces and items, but also own them in an immutable fashion as well.

At the end of July, news.Bitcoin.com reviewed the virtual world

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Health care real estate firm eyeing metro Denver for corporate headquarters

A multibillion-dollar California real estate investment trust and the U.S. arm of a Japanese aerospace firm are considering locating their headquarters in metro Denver, according to incentive requests approved this week by the Colorado Economic Development Commission.

Healthpeak Properties, a real estate investment trust based in Irvine, Calif., was approved for up to $5.3 million in Job Growth Incentive Tax Credits if it brings 166 net new full-time jobs to the state. The company, which applied under the codename Project Pegasus, expects the primarily executive-level jobs will pay an average annual wage of $425,213 a year.

“It would be the highest projected average annual wage if they move forward with Colorado,” said Jill McGranahan, a spokeswoman for the Colorado Office of Economic Development & International Trade.

One question around Healthpeak’s award is whether it could actually take advantage of those state tax credits. Real  estate investment trusts must pay out

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