COVID-19 Can Spread Among Ill-Equipped Nursing Homes That Share Staff : Shots

On average, each U.S. nursing home is connected to seven others through shared staff, a study by Yale and UCLA researchers suggests. Rigorous infection control measures can curb spread of the coronavirus, but many workers say they still don’t have sufficient masks and other PPE.

SDI Productions/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

SDI Productions/Getty Images

On average, each U.S. nursing home is connected to seven others through shared staff, a study by Yale and UCLA researchers suggests. Rigorous infection control measures can curb spread of the coronavirus, but many workers say they still don’t have sufficient masks and other PPE.

SDI Productions/Getty Images

To make ends meet, Martha Tapia works 64 hours a week at two different Orange County, Calif., nursing homes. She is one of thousands of certified nursing assistants who perform the intimate and physical work of bathing, dressing and feeding the nation’s fragile elderly.

“We do everything

Read More

Minn. nursing homes in rural areas see staff shortages worsen with COVID-19

In a matter of hours in early October, Paul Gaebe’s Friday went from normal to one of dire emergency. A resident at Mother of Mercy assisted living facility in Albany, Minn., had COVID-19.

“We had several staff that had contact with that individual,” Gaebe said. “And suddenly we went from normal staffing to short staffing within less than a day.”

Then a handful of high school students who also worked as care attendants at the home quit. Gaebe says they worried they wouldn’t be able to attend school if they were working with patients who had COVID-19.

“In a matter of about 24 hours we lost 16 employees.”

Gaebe experienced what many of his colleagues in the long-term care industry have learned over the last eight months.

“They said that when it hits, be prepared that it can go through your staffing, it could just ravage your staffing plans in

Read More

UWM Homeowner Study Shows Consumers are Shopping, Financing and Selling Homes Differently Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

PONTIAC, Mich., Oct. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ —  United Wholesale Mortgage, (UWM), #1 wholesale lender and largest purchase mortgage lender in America, announced the results from its 2020 COVID-19 homeowner survey. The survey was conducted by a third party to survey 1,000 U.S. homeowners in September 2020.

“Home is more important than ever today,” said Sarah DeCiantis, CMO of UWM. “So we responded to the need in the market by making rates in the two’s available for new homes, refinances and cash-out refinances available exclusively through independent mortgage brokers.”

Key findings include changes in home buying habits during COVID-19:

  • Close to half of the consumers surveyed who moved to a new home moved to the suburbs since March 1, 2020.
  • Since March 1, 2020 70% of the people surveyed who purchased a new primary home also sold their old home, with nearly 3 in 4 consumers selling
Read More

Grocery prices are down from their COVID-19 summer peaks. But here’s why your food bills are still stubbornly high.

Eva Rosol was stunned during the summer when a rotisserie chicken that she could normally find on sale for $6 suddenly set her back $15.

Rosol, a resident of the Chicago suburb Westmont, Ill., who lost her job as a substitute teacher when COVID-19 shut schools in March, could afford it thanks to the extra $600 per week in unemployment benefits the federal government offered during the first four months of the pandemic. But those extra benefits expired in late July.

Now Rosol, 54, who has a business degree and is seeking a job in sales, receives $108 weekly in unemployment aid. Meanwhile, her husband, who sells advertising for an auto and RV magazine, is making a quarter of what he normally earns.

Rosol has nixed the one night a week they used to eat out, shops the circulars and frequents five different grocery stores to find the lowest prices,

Read More

Nursing homes prepare for third COVID-19 surge

 Nursing homes, long in the spotlight as a key battleground in the fight to prevent the spread of COVID-19, are making key structural changes to prepare for an expected third surge of the disease. 

Facilities have implemented increased testing, promoted mask use and changed clinical practices in an effort to protect older Americans who are at higher risk of complications from the coronavirus.

While many changes are temporary to mitigate the virus until a vaccine is available, others are more permanent.

I think that what wont end will be a renewed and strengthened emphasis on infection control,” said Mark Parkinson, CEO of the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL).

The AHCA/NCAL, which represents more than 14,000 skilled nursing centers, assisted living communities and other homes, is preparing for “the next pandemic,” Parkinson said, as many weren’t prepared for the current one.

Read More

El Paso, Texas, funeral homes prepare refrigerated units to house bodies as Covid-19 cases soar

Part of that effort, two funeral homes told CNN, is to prepare additional refrigerated units to house bodies if their usual space isn’t enough.

On Thursday, El Paso County officials reported 1,161 new Covid-19 cases — a record high for the area, according to a daily coronavirus case report from the county. As of Friday, the total case count sits at 37,263.
This week saw Covid-19 cases soar across the US, with Thursday the first day with more than 70,000 new cases recorded since July 24, Johns Hopkins University data show. More than 41,000 people were also hospitalized across the US — the highest level of nationwide hospitalizations since August 20, according to the Covid Tracking Project.
The virus has claimed more than 223,000 lives in the United States. That tally includes over 570 people in El Paso, a county of about 840,000 residents. Another 157 deaths there are under
Read More

Off Market Pittsburgh’s Abundant Inventory Of Discounted COVID-19 Foreclosed Properties Now Available

Local Investors Can Save 30-70% Off Real Estate Retail Prices

PITTSBURGH (PRWEB) October 22, 2020

Off Market Pittsburgh, a real estate investment company that specializes in securing off-market residential and commercial real estate in the greater Pittsburgh region, invites local real estate investors to discover its increased inventory due to market effects caused by COVID-19. As the number of sheriff sale and foreclosed homes increase at accelerating rates, now is an opportune time for investors and cash buyers to purchase a property through Off Market Pittsburgh and receive significant savings off retail values.

“COVID-19 has begun to cause a foreclosure crisis across the United States and the number of foreclosed properties in the Pittsburgh market is growing,” said Kyleigh Haynes, Owner, Founder, and CEO of Off Market Pittsburgh. According to CoreLogic, the number of US mortgages that are at least 90 days past due more than doubled from May to

Read More

Language dispute at Quebec condo building over COVID-19 sign



text, letter: This sign is being called "disrespectful." Oct 21, 2020.


© Dan Spector / Global News
This sign is being called “disrespectful.” Oct 21, 2020.

Melina Migiakis is furious with the administration at the Ahuntstic-Cartierville condo building her elderly grandparents call home over posted signs about COVID-19 restrictions.

“It’s so disrespectful. It’s so degrading,” she told Global News.

Her anger was sparked by signs explaining COVID-19 measures banning people from accepting most visitors, written in French only. Her Greek immigrant grandparents don’t have a strong understanding of French.

READ MORE: Montreal ‘progressing in the right way’ as coronavirus cases start to plateau, officials say

“We saw the signs about COVID-19 in the elevator. My mother and I had written on the note: ‘English, please.’ You know, we even called them. He never got back to us,” she said.

Read More

Manitoba’s COVID-19 numbers trend downward as bars and restaurants face restrictions

WINNIPEG – Manitoba’s COVID-19 numbers have started to drop somewhat following a surge last week and after restrictions were imposed on restaurants and bars.

Health officials reported 80 new cases and the deaths of two residents at a Winnipeg personal care home Monday.

It was the fourth consecutive day that the new case number was in the double-digits after peaking last week at 173.

Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Brent Roussin said there is no definitive way to link the drop to earlier closing times that were imposed on licensed restaurants and bars in the Winnipeg region two weeks ago.

But he said that was the aim of the rules — to cut the case count by reducing the amount of time people spend gathered in groups in close quarters.

“We just know with this virus that it’s prolonged indoor contact, and so businesses that have that as a major

Read More

‘It’s so disrespectful’: Language dispute at Quebec condo building over COVID-19 sign – Montreal

Melina Migiakis is furious with the administration at the Ahuntstic-Cartierville condo building her elderly grandparents call home over posted signs about COVID-19 restrictions.

“It’s so disrespectful. It’s so degrading,” she told Global News.

Her anger was sparked by signs explaining COVID-19 measures banning people from accepting most visitors, written in French only. Her Greek immigrant grandparents don’t have a strong understanding of French.

READ MORE: Montreal ‘progressing in the right way’ as coronavirus cases start to plateau, officials say

“We saw the signs about COVID-19 in the elevator. My mother and I had written on the note: ‘English, please.’ You know, we even called them. He never got back to us,” she said.

Read More