Lapses in planning, communication and safety left Connecticut’s nursing homes exposed when the coronavirus pandemic struck in force

The first inkling Joseph Notarino’s family had that something was wrong came only a few days after nurses at the Whispering Pines nursing home posted a photo of him eating ice cream. It was March 26 and Notarino had only been there a few weeks, rehabbing from surgery.



a sign on the side of a road: Kimberly Hall North, according to death certificate data obtained by The Courant, was one of the hardest hit facilities in the country, with 43 deaths caused by COVID-19 complications.


© Kassi Jackson / Hartford Courant/Hartford Courant/TNS
Kimberly Hall North, according to death certificate data obtained by The Courant, was one of the hardest hit facilities in the country, with 43 deaths caused by COVID-19 complications.

Five days later his wife made her daily call to the East Haven facility and was told Joe wasn’t feeling well. The plan was to give him Tylenol. At 9:15 that same night, they called to say he had died.

The 85-year-old war veteran was one of the first to die of COVID-19 at Whispering Pines, but within weeks a total of 24 residents would

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