Looking for a lift to the polls? Funeral homes are offering free limo rides to boost voter turnout

BALTIMORE, Md. — Older voters worried about safely getting to the polls next month while dodging the coronavirus will have a stylish, unconventional transportation option: A free limo ride, courtesy of funeral homeowners in Baltimore and around the country.

Local funeral home directors say they hope to transport up to 21,000 people in Baltimore to voting booths for the Nov. 3 election, part of an effort by the National Funeral Directors & Morticians Association to offer rides to as many as 300,000 people nationwide.

The initiative is not new, said Hari P. Close, the organization’s national president and owner of Hari P. Close Funeral Service in Northeast Baltimore. The organization has driven people to the polls in Baltimore for 25 years, Close said, and the service peaked with about 300,000 rides nationally for the 2008 and 2012 election victories of President Barack Obama.

That figure dipped to about 80,000 four

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Funeral homes offer limousine rides to the polls nationwide

BALTIMORE — Some voters could ride in style to the polls on Election Day courtesy of funeral home limousines offered to chauffer older residents to voting booths amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The National Funeral Directors & Morticians Association expects to offer free rides to up to 300,000 people nationwide on Nov. 3, including in Baltimore, Miami, Detroit, Los Angeles and Kansas City, according to a statement obtained by The Baltimore Sun.

Hari P. Close, the organization’s national president and owner of Hari P. Close Funeral Service in Baltimore, said funeral home directors in his city hope to transport up to 21,000 people in Baltimore alone. The program aims to serve those 55 and older, but won’t turn down any ride requests.

The initiative has helped get people to the polls in Baltimore for 25 years, and ridership peaked on election days in 2008 and 2012, Close said. He emphasized that

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Looking for a lift to the polls? Baltimore funeral homes are offering free limo rides to boost voter turnout

Older voters worried about safely getting to the polls next month while dodging the coronavirus will have a stylish, unconventional transportation option: A free limo ride, courtesy of funeral homeowners in Baltimore and around the country.

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Local funeral home directors say they hope to transport up to 21,000 people in Baltimore to voting booths for the Nov. 3 election, part of an effort by the National Funeral Directors & Morticians Association to offer rides to as many as 300,000 people nationwide.

The initiative is not new, said Hari P. Close, the organization’s national president and owner of Hari P. Close Funeral Service in Northeast Baltimore. The organization has driven people to the polls in Baltimore for 25 years, Close said, and the service peaked with about 300,000 rides nationally for the 2008 and 2012 election victories of President Barack Obama.

That figure dipped to about 80,000 four years

Read More

Traeger Grills Is Smoking Voters Out of Their Homes to Get Americans to the Polls

For many years, conventional marketing wisdom held that brands should steer clear of political issues. The reasoning was simple enough: What company could afford to alienate a single customer by taking a position on something controversial?

But as the socially conscious millennial generation has taken its place as a $1.4 trillion spending bloc, there’s been a marked shift in this thinking. In 2018, data from Sprout Social found that a whopping 70% of consumers aren’t just OK with brands taking political stances, they consider it “important” that they do so—and that percentage was up from 64% in 2017.

But with some notable exceptions like Patagonia putting “Vote the Assholes Out” on the underside of its garment labels (a reference to officeholders who deny that climate change is real), the highly contentious nature of this election season makes taking a political stance a bigger risk than it’s historically been. And that

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