CA scrambles to fix flawed wildfire safety rebate program

After hundreds of thousands of Northern Californians endured a string of deliberate wildfire-safety blackouts last fall, state regulators created millions of dollars in rebates so the neediest of households could buy high-tech batteries to store up electricity.

The plan had a loophole, however, allowing well-heeled customers to take advantage of the rebates. In some cases, residents have been receiving cash to buy storage batteries for their vacation homes, according to officials with the Public Utilities Commission, which runs the program.

“We should have put tighter controls on this,” PUC Commissioner Liane Randolph said at an Oct. 8 commission meeting.

Now the PUC is scrambling to fix the program.

On Thursday, the PUC will vote on a proposal to overhaul the program by imposing income limits on applicants. The idea is to “direct our scarce resources to the customers with the greatest need,” said PUC Commissioner Clifford Rechtschaffen, who’s spearheading the

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Lapses in planning, communication and safety left Connecticut’s nursing homes exposed when the coronavirus pandemic struck in force

The first inkling Joseph Notarino’s family had that something was wrong came only a few days after nurses at the Whispering Pines nursing home posted a photo of him eating ice cream. It was March 26 and Notarino had only been there a few weeks, rehabbing from surgery.



a sign on the side of a road: Kimberly Hall North, according to death certificate data obtained by The Courant, was one of the hardest hit facilities in the country, with 43 deaths caused by COVID-19 complications.


© Kassi Jackson / Hartford Courant/Hartford Courant/TNS
Kimberly Hall North, according to death certificate data obtained by The Courant, was one of the hardest hit facilities in the country, with 43 deaths caused by COVID-19 complications.

Five days later his wife made her daily call to the East Haven facility and was told Joe wasn’t feeling well. The plan was to give him Tylenol. At 9:15 that same night, they called to say he had died.

The 85-year-old war veteran was one of the first to die of COVID-19 at Whispering Pines, but within weeks a total of 24 residents would

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Mayor announces $3.4 million home health and safety grant

LINCOLN, Neb. (KOLN) – Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird announced that the City has received a $3.4 million home health and safety grant on Tuesday. She was joined by Jason Mohr, Regional Administrator for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and City officials.



a group of people standing next to a man in a suit and tie: Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird announced that the City has received a $3.4 million home health and safety grant on Tuesday.


© Provided by Lincoln & Hastings-Krny KOLN
Mayor Leirion Gaylor Baird announced that the City has received a $3.4 million home health and safety grant on Tuesday.

The grant aims to protect children and families from lead-based paint hazards. HUD is providing these grants through its Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction Grant Program to identify and clean up dangerous lead in low-income families’ homes and HUD’s Healthy Homes Supplemental funding to help communities with housing-related health and safety hazards in addition to lead-based paint hazards.

City staff will be working with other medical and social service providers to address lead hazards in nearly 70 housing

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