HUD awards WSU nearly $700,000 for study on preventing lead exposure in children

Wayne State University has been awarded nearly $700,000 in federal funding to study protecting children from lead exposure in their homes, officials said.

The grant is part of $9.4 million the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has given to 13 universities to research ways to reduce housing-related health hazards, such as pests, injury hazards and asthma triggers. 

“We remain committed to improving the health and wellbeing of all Americans, especially children, by creating safer and healthier homes,” HUD Secretary Ben Carson said Wednesday in a statement. “This research will inform HUD and our partners in our efforts to protect families and eliminate housing-related health and safety hazards.”

HUD officials said WSU will be given $699,171 to partner with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, CLEARCorps Detroit and the Detroit Health Department to study the cost effectiveness of protecting children from lead exposure through improved temporary emergency

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4 in 10 Americans want to buy a house because of the pandemic, study finds

The pandemic is pushing 4 in 10 Americans to consider buying a home in the next six to 12 months, a new survey found, largely to get more space.

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But many worry the hot housing market could derail those plans.

“Whether it is an extra bedroom or office or outdoor space for kids to go, it shows people don’t want to live in condensed areas anymore,” said Kimberly Lanham, vice president at Mphasis Digital Risk, which conducted the survey of 1,113 people. “They want to get out and spend time in natural spaces, where they can actually walk.”

Nearly two-thirds of respondents want a spare bedroom, while 63% cite a deck or patio and 56% cite an office as top amenities in a new home. Additionally, 45% want additional space for their children, while a third want to leave more densely populated areas. About 3 in 10 prefer

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UWM Homeowner Study Shows Consumers are Shopping, Financing and Selling Homes Differently Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

PONTIAC, Mich., Oct. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ —  United Wholesale Mortgage, (UWM), #1 wholesale lender and largest purchase mortgage lender in America, announced the results from its 2020 COVID-19 homeowner survey. The survey was conducted by a third party to survey 1,000 U.S. homeowners in September 2020.

“Home is more important than ever today,” said Sarah DeCiantis, CMO of UWM. “So we responded to the need in the market by making rates in the two’s available for new homes, refinances and cash-out refinances available exclusively through independent mortgage brokers.”

Key findings include changes in home buying habits during COVID-19:

  • Close to half of the consumers surveyed who moved to a new home moved to the suburbs since March 1, 2020.
  • Since March 1, 2020 70% of the people surveyed who purchased a new primary home also sold their old home, with nearly 3 in 4 consumers selling
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Coronavirus study finds jetliners are safer than operating rooms

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Allegiant Air removed a man after he repeatedly interrupted the pre-flight safety briefing to tell the flight attendant to put her mask back on.

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A new study conducted for the Department of Defense adds credence to the growing belief that airline passengers face minimal risk of contracting coronavirus when flying.

The study found the risk of aerosol dispersion – transmission of the virus through the air – was reduced 99.7% thanks to high air exchange rates, HEPA-filtered recirculation and downward ventilation found on modern jets.

Investigators looked at the impact of an infected passenger on others seated in the same row and those nearby in the cabins of Boeing 767s and 777s. Those two aircraft types are widebodies typically used for long-haul flights where a virus would be expected to spread more easily.

To test the exposure risk for passengers sitting near an infected person, researchers released fluorescent

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Is The Risk Of Sea Level Rise Affecting Florida Home Prices? A New Study Says Yes : NPR

A new study has found that home sale prices and volume appear to be declining in Florida coastal areas at vulnerable to rising sea levels compared to coastal areas with less risk. Here, the balcony view from a luxury condo in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla., in 2017.

Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images


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Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images

A new study has found that home sale prices and volume appear to be declining in Florida coastal areas at vulnerable to rising sea levels compared to coastal areas with less risk. Here, the balcony view from a luxury condo in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla., in 2017.

Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images

How much should you pay for a home that is likely to be inundated by rising seas in the decades ahead?

It’s a tough question — and an increasingly common one for homebuyers along the Florida coast.

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