Black residents built Halyard Park. Now they fear being taxed out their homes as downtown development moves northward.

Lennie Mosley, president of the Halyard Park Neighborhood Association, first moved to the area with her husband in 1980.



Marjorie Johnson standing posing for the camera: Lennie Mosley stands outside her home, right, on North 5th Street in the Halyard Park neighborhood in Milwaukee. Mosley, who has lived in Halyard Park since 1980 and is president of the Halyard Park Neighborhood Association, thinks development is good, but she is worried about its effect on property taxes.


© Mike De Sisti / The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Lennie Mosley stands outside her home, right, on North 5th Street in the Halyard Park neighborhood in Milwaukee. Mosley, who has lived in Halyard Park since 1980 and is president of the Halyard Park Neighborhood Association, thinks development is good, but she is worried about its effect on property taxes.

Back then, she said, few people wanted to live there. Now, the neighborhood’s location within walking distance of Fiserv Forum and related projects has put its housing in high demand and led to a sharp rise in property taxes.

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In recent decades, the adjacent Brewers Hill neighborhood experienced gentrification, with longtime residents pushed out as property values skyrocketed due to demand from wealthier buyers who moved in, resulting in higher

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Scrap rapid Covid tests in England’s care homes, experts urge

Experts have called for an end to the use of rapid coronavirus tests in universities and care homes, after government figures from the mass testing programme in Liverpool revealed the tests missed 30% of those with a high viral load.



a group of people in a room: Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

The figures showed that the rapid tests identified just five out of 10 positive cases which had been detected by standard coronavirus tests, and seven out of 10 of those with high quantities of the virus.

The rapid tests, also known as lateral flow tests, provide much quicker results than standard tests. This speed has led to their use in care homes to allow family members to visit, and in universities to allow students to return home for Christmas.

Related: Christmas Covid testing for UK students a ‘recipe for chaos’, says union

Allyson Pollock, professor of public health at Newcastle University,

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LGI Homes Reports November 2020 Home Closings and Updates Full Year 2020 Home Closings Guidance

THE WOODLANDS, Texas, Dec. 03, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — LGI Homes, Inc. (NASDAQ: LGIH) today announced 960 home closings in November 2020, up from 748 home closings in November 2019, representing year-over-year growth of 28.3%. In addition, the Company ended the first eleven months of 2020 with 7,709 home closings, a 16.1% increase over 6,638 home closings during the first eleven months of 2019.

As of the end of November 2020, the Company had 114 active selling communities.

“We are proud to announce another record breaking month of home closings,” said Eric Lipar, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of LGI Homes. “This was our best November on record and the second best month of closings overall in our history. Based on this outstanding November performance and our current view of the backlog available to close in December, we are updating our full year closings guidance to reflect our expectation of

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Homes festooned with lights throughout Friendswood

It’s quite obvious Friendswood residents treat decorating their homes for Christmas with a passion.

Even a recent rainy night didn’t dampen the joy of seeing so many houses lit up. The decorating was spectacular.

Everything and anything on someone’s property was ripe for a string of multicolored and white lights. Perhaps the closest to a breath-taking sight were the two large trees on Sunset Drive that had hundreds of lights on the tree trunk and branches.

In the 300 block of Sunset, a tree in the center of the front yard was covered in white lights, its long-extending branches adorned with lights. But then in the 400 block of Sunset, there’s a tree totally covered in blue lights. Absolutely amazing and beautiful.

Spectacular Christmas light displays can be found on Woodlawn Drive and Terra Nova Court. On Los Frailes Drive, there’s a two-story house completely covered in blue lights. Driving

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Brush fire in Rancho San Diego burns 1 home, damages 6 others

A brush fire erupted Wednesday night in a San Diego suburb destroying one home and threatening about 200 others as dry Santa Ana winds fanned the flames, authorities said.

The fire broke out around 10 p.m. in a belt of undeveloped land in Rancho San Diego, southeast of El Cajon, according to San Diego County sheriff’s Lt. Mark Moreno.

One structure was destroyed and six others were damaged, said Capt. Thomas Shoots, a spokesman for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

As of 7 a.m. Thursday, fire officials reported the fire had charred 30 acres and was 50% contained, Shoots said.

Sheriff’s deputies began evacuating the area immediately as the fire spread Wednesday night, going door-to-door to about 200 homes to tell residents to leave, authorities said.

Around 3:45 a.m., county officials lifted the evacuation orders, but road closures remained in effect for some communities.

Shoots said firefighters

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Opinion | How to save thousands of Americans from losing their homes

While forced moves exact high tolls, many are cheap to prevent; renters regularly owe only a few hundred dollars when facing eviction. But once people become homeless, the cost to taxpayers can amount to tens of thousands of dollars per person per year. Even before the pandemic, some cities began offering emergency programs to prevent homelessness by providing short-term assistance that can be applied to back rent, utilities and other qualifying renters’ expenses. An evaluation of one such program, Chicago’s Homelessness Prevention Call Center, found the intervention reduced the likelihood of homeless shelter use by 76 percent. The Homebase program in New York cut the number of nights families spent in shelters by 70 percent.

Yet while local governments are well positioned to administer emergency rental assistance, only the federal government has the necessary resources to provide adequate funding. We estimate a national program would cost $4.5 billion in a

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Experts call for end of rapid Covid tests in universities and care homes in England

Experts have called for an end to the use of rapid coronavirus tests in universities and care homes, after government figures from the mass testing programme in Liverpool revealed the tests missed 30% of those with a high viral load.



a group of people in a room: Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Oli Scarff/AFP/Getty Images

The figures showed that the rapid tests identified just five out of 10 positive cases which had been detected by standard coronavirus tests, and seven out of 10 of those with high quantities of the virus.

The rapid tests, also known as lateral flow tests, provide much quicker results than standard tests. This speed has led to their use in care homes to allow family members to visit, and in universities to allow students to return home for Christmas.

Related: Christmas Covid testing for UK students a ‘recipe for chaos’, says union

Allyson Pollock, professor of public health at Newcastle University,

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COVID-19 outbreaks at two San Jose nursing homes infect hundreds

SAN JOSE — As COVID-19 cases in California surge once again, Bay Area nursing homes and homeless centers have been hit with outbreaks, including two San Jose nursing facilities that have a combined 232 cases.

One facility, Westwood Post-Acute, which was formerly Amberwood Gardens, had 151 total confirmed cases of COVID-19 as of Wednesday, according to Santa Clara County officials, including 81 among residents there and 70 among staff.

The other facility, Skyline Healthcare Center, had 86 total positive cases as of Wednesday, with 66 cases among residents and 20 among health care workers.

County officials said they are providing specialized teams to investigate the outbreaks and provide support to affected facilities. They are conducting testing on-site, enforcing safety measures and offering county staff up to serve in the facilities if staffing is short due to facility employees testing positives.

“The larger the situation, the more resources we provide,” said

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With No Options, Displaced Iraqi Yazidis Return To Homes Destroyed In ISIS Fight : NPR

Nofa Khudeda (left) and a neighbor in the village of Tel Qasab on the day Khudeda and her husband returned after six years in a camp for displaced Yazidis. Khudeda and her husband, Ali Edo, repaired and renovated the house, which had been looted by ISIS fighters and then militias that fought ISIS.

Jane Arraf/NPR


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Jane Arraf/NPR

Nofa Khudeda (left) and a neighbor in the village of Tel Qasab on the day Khudeda and her husband returned after six years in a camp for displaced Yazidis. Khudeda and her husband, Ali Edo, repaired and renovated the house, which had been looted by ISIS fighters and then militias that fought ISIS.

Jane Arraf/NPR

In the Yazidi village of Tel Qasab, Iraq, delighted neighbors welcome Nofa Khudeda as she walks into the house she fled six years ago when ISIS invaded the region. Khudeda, wearing a beige print

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Iowa health care workers, nursing homes to get 1st vaccines

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Tens of thousands of health care workers, nursing home residents and staff will be the first people in Iowa to get COVID-19 vaccines, likely in the next few weeks, officials said Thursday.

Iowa expects to receive 172,000 doses of vaccines produced by Pfizer and Moderna over the next month, assuming both products receive emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration, Gov. Kim Reynolds said.

Each vaccine requires people to get two doses, three or four weeks apart. The companies say large studies have shown that the vaccines are highly effective at preventing illness, and the FDA is evaluating those claims and their safety before it decides whether to authorize their emergency use.


Iowa will use a portion of its initial allocation for health care workers, storing the vaccines at six sites around the state, Iowa Department of Human Services director Kelly Garcia said.

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