Florida electrical company didn’t pay earned overtime: Labor

A Palm Bay electrical contractor was found to have failed to pony up $19,642 in earned overtime pay after a U.S. Department of Labor investigation, the agency announced.

Cornelius Electrical Contractors owes that money to 13 employees, or $1,510.92 per worker.

Labor said Cornelius, registered in Florida and run by Michael Cornelius since 2005, didn’t count employees’ transportation time between jobs as time at work. Nor did the company count incentive pay when figuring in overtime rates.

“Travel time between job sites during the work day must be counted as work time,” said a statement from Wage and Hour Division District Director Wildalí De Jesús. “We encourage other employers to use this investigation as an opportunity to review their own pay practices, ensure they comply, and avoid violations like those in this case.”

Employers that find they’ve committed overtime or minimum wage violations can self-report through the Payroll Audit Independent

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A look at what didn’t happen this week

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week. None of these are legit, even though they were shared widely on social media. The Associated Press checked them out. Here are the facts:



FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2020, file photo, an election worker sorts vote-by-mail ballots at the Miami-Dade County Board of Elections, in Doral, Fla. On Friday, Oct. 30, 2020, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly asserting that 23% of mail-in ballots have been rejected for missing signatures in Florida’s Miami-Dade County. The correct number is about 0.5%. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Oct. 26, 2020, file photo, an election worker sorts vote-by-mail ballots at the Miami-Dade County Board of Elections, in Doral, Fla. On Friday, Oct. 30, 2020, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly asserting that 23% of mail-in ballots have been rejected for missing signatures in Florida’s Miami-Dade County. The correct number is about 0.5%. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

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Biden tax plan would not raise taxes on majority of Americans

CLAIM: By reversing President Donald Trump’s tax cuts, Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden would raise taxes on 82% of Americans.

THE FACTS: A popular but false

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NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn’t happen this week

THE FACTS: A popular but false post on Facebook claims, “By reversing the tax cuts @realDonaldTrump signed into law, Joe Biden would raise taxes on 82% of Americans.” The quote is attributed to Ronna McDaniel, chairwoman of the Republican National Committee, who made similar inaccurate claims at the party’s convention in August. In fact, Biden says he won’t raise taxes on anyone making less than $400,000, which translates to a small portion of American households. “If you’re looking only at individual income taxes and payroll taxes, we find that about 2 percent of all families would see their taxes go up directly under the Biden plan – almost all of them in the top 5 percent by income,” John Ricco, a senior tax analyst at the University of Pennsylvania’s Penn Wharton Budget Model, told The Associated Press in an email. Biden has also proposed repealing part of Trump’s corporate tax

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HUD inspectors find Ben Carson’s actions didn’t benefit son in Baltimore deals, but had the ‘appearance’ of ethical issues

The inspector general’s office for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Affairs released an investigative report Tuesday that found no evidence that HUD Secretary Ben Carson used his position to benefit his son’s business interests in Baltimore, but he “could have done more to avoid the appearance that he was not complying with federal ethics regulations.”

The investigation stems largely from a 2017 “listening tour” in the city by Carson, a former neurosurgeon at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore.

The report said the inspector general’s office received “multiple complaints” that the HUD secretary allowed his son to invite companies and individuals to participate in the tour to advance his own financial interests. Ben Carson Jr. is chairman of a Columbia-based investment firm called Interprise Partners.

The investigation by the HUD watchdog specifically focuses on a stop on the tour in the Poppleton neighborhood, a hardscrabble part of West

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