Sheldon Solow, Billionaire Real Estate Developer, Dies at 92

(Bloomberg) — Sheldon Solow, a Brooklyn-born college drop-out who became a real estate billionaire by developing architecturally distinctive high-rise buildings in Manhattan, has died. He was 92.

He died Tuesday at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York after a month-long battle with lymphoma, according to Mia Fonssagrives Solow, his wife of 48 years.



Sheldon Solow wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera: Sheldon Solow GETTY sub


© Photographer: Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images
Sheldon Solow GETTY sub

Sheldon Solow

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Photographer: Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images

Solow was best known for the 50-story office tower at 9 West 57th Street in Manhattan. A black building with upwardly sloped glass sides, it offered unbroken views of Central Park and was marked with a large red sculpture in the form of the number 9 on the sidewalk in front of its main entrance. The skyscraper’s tenants include hedge funds, private equity firms and luxury goods giant Chanel.

The property developer’s holdings included more than 2,000 apartments in

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New York Real Estate Billionaire Sheldon Solow Dies At 92

New York real estate mogul Sheldon Solow died on Tuesday in New York at age 92. In a career spanning more than half a century, the Brooklyn-born developer built an empire of gleaming skyscrapers spanning millions of square feet across Manhattan. His death was reportedly caused by lymphoma.

Solow was one of the richest residents of New York City, with a fortune that Forbes estimated at $4.4 billion. The mogul appeared at No. 167 in the 2020 Forbes 400 list of America’s richest people. Solow earned a spot on the inaugural Forbes 400 list back in 1982 with a fortune estimated at over $100 million. He was one of only a handful of billionaires on the 2020 ranking to appear both on the 1982 list and on this year’s edition (another is President Donald

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Dog rescuer Paul Schultz dies at 79; fostered and found homes for 118 greyhounds

An entire industry grew out of the dazzling propulsion of the greyhound.

They can hit speeds of 40 miles an hour, the fastest of any dog.

Paul Schultz fell in love with the breed, so like a cross between a Cheetah and a canine. He knew that after short bursts of high-speed energy, they like to curl up and sleep at the foot of someone they trust.

After adopting his greyhound Comet, he fostered 117 more, adopted eight of them, and helped find permanent homes for the rest.

He and his wife Toni “fostered more dogs than anyone I know,” said Barbara Karant, president of Greyhounds Only, one of the nation’s biggest greyhound adoption groups.

The Vernon Hills resident died last month at 79 after a series of strokes, according to his son Howard.

The Schultzes “were go-to for any dog who had a health problem, a behavioral issue, a

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‘Last-ditch’ effort made to extend eviction, foreclosure moratorium before it expires dies in Legislature

Theatrics outside a courthouse, calls from the federal delegation and a last-ditch legislative Hail Mary weren’t enough to bring lawmakers back to the State House to act on a bill to extend an eviction and foreclosure ban set to expire on Saturday.



a group of people lying on the ground: BOSTON, MA. - OCTOBER 15: Protesters lay down during a rally to prevent Massachusetts evictions in front of Boston Housing Court on October 15, 2020 in Boston, Massachusetts.  (Staff Photo By Matt Stone/ MediaNews Group/Boston Herald)


© Provided by Boston Herald
BOSTON, MA. – OCTOBER 15: Protesters lay down during a rally to prevent Massachusetts evictions in front of Boston Housing Court on October 15, 2020 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Staff Photo By Matt Stone/ MediaNews Group/Boston Herald)

“This was a last-ditch effort … but it’s disappointing,” state Rep. Mike Connolly said after lawmakers — by their inaction — decided to allow the clock on the moratorium to run out.

The Cambridge Democrat was able to get a bill to extend the temporary ban on evictions and foreclosures passed in the House, but it didn’t vote until the Senate had already adjourned for the weekend.

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‘Last-ditch’ effort to extend eviction, foreclosure moratorium before it expires dies in Legislature

Theatrics outside a courthouse, calls from the federal delegation and a last-ditch legislative Hail Mary weren’t enough to bring lawmakers back to the State House to act on a bill to extend an eviction and foreclosure ban set to expire on Saturday.

“This was a last-ditch effort … but it’s disappointing,” state Rep. Mike Connolly said after lawmakers — by their inaction — decided to allow the clock on the moratorium to run out.

The Cambridge Democrat was able to get a bill to extend the temporary ban on evictions and foreclosures passed in the House, but it didn’t vote until the Senate had already adjourned for the weekend. Connolly’s bill sought to circumvent the typical process and trigger an immediate floor vote — something that required approval by both houses.

State Sen. Pat Jehlen, who is sponsoring twin legislation in the Senate, said housing advocates’ last hope now lies

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