Michigan legislature has internal COVID-19 protocols, but lacks buy-in from some GOP lawmakers

LANSING, MI – Early in the pandemic, Rep. Tyrone Carter, D-Detroit, was the first state lawmaker to test positive for COVID-19 on March 26.

Three days later, Rep. Isaac Robinson, D-Detroit, died at Detroit Receiving Hospital after suffering breathing problems. His death was later linked to the coronavirus.

More Capitol cases would follow: Rep. Karen Whitsett, D-Detroit in April; Sen. Tom Barrett, R-Charlotte, and Rep. Beau Lafave, R-Iron Mountain, in September. Senate Minority Leader Jim Ananich, D-Flint, announced he was recovering from home on Nov. 6.

And over the past week, three more Republican lawmakers tested positive: Kim LaSata of Bainbridge Township, Ann Bollin of Brighton and Scott VanSingel of Grant.

In total, COVID-19 has infected 6% of Michigan’s 149 state lawmakers in the House and Senate. That’s more than twice the overall rate of infection in Michigan, 2.6%.

The legislature hasn’t been able to craft a plan to stop

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Panic buying, businesses to shutter as new Covid restrictions loom. WA GOP urges special session

Washington Republicans say the Legislature should immediately meet in special session to address the economic fallout from Gov. Jay Inslee’s latest Covid-19 orders – and even consider tapping the state’s “rainy day” fund.

Under Inslee’s orders, gyms, movie theaters, bowling alleys and museums will once again have to close. Also, restaurants and bars will have to cease offering indoor dining service and limit outdoor dining to five people per table. Many other businesses will also be affected. The new rules will remain in effect for at least the next four weeks. 

In a Facebook post, House Republican Leader J.T. Wilcox said the new restrictions will result in a “catastrophic cost” to small-and-family-owned hospitality businesses.

“The executive branch should be able to produce plans to save these people as quickly as they can produce plans to restrict them,” Wilcox wrote.

He also said House Republicans, who are in the minority, are

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Who lost the White House for the GOP?

There’s only one person to blame for the GOP’s loss of the White House, and it’s the guy living in it. Voters sent a message to Washington last week that they are warm to conservative policies but couldn’t stomach another four years of Donald J. Trump.

How do we know? Because Republican candidates performed well above expectations down-ballot. Americans overall rejected a wholesale move toward more progressive policies, even flipping unexpected House seats to red.

So why the different outcomes for the President and congressional Republicans?

I’ve had countless conversations with fellow conservatives about Trump’s policies versus Trump’s personality in the last four years. Often, others would encourage me to set aside my concerns regarding the President’s arrogance and dishonesty, arguing that his policies made up for it.

While there were elements of his policy agenda I supported (and some that I didn’t because they were not conservative in theory

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Biden, allies gear up to face a GOP Senate

The emerging likelihood of a Republican Senate and a Joe Biden presidency have left Democrats split on whether to keep fighting for potentially doomed progressive priorities or compromise with the GOP on both personnel and policy.



Joe Biden et al. standing next to a man in a suit and tie: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), left, and Vice President Joe Biden, walk through Statuary Hall on their way to a joint session of Congress to count the votes in Washington, Friday, Jan. 6, 2017.


© Zach Gibson/AP Photo
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), left, and Vice President Joe Biden, walk through Statuary Hall on their way to a joint session of Congress to count the votes in Washington, Friday, Jan. 6, 2017.

Although votes are still being counted in Nevada, Arizona, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Georgia, and lawsuits likely to drag on for weeks, Democratic officials and advocacy groups are already confronting the prospect of several more years of Mitch McConnell controlling which bills and nominees will see the light of day. At this point, their best hope of being able to set the agenda is either winning both runoff elections in Georgia this January, or waiting

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COVID start-up based in GOP donor’s luxury condo could get millions from U.S.

An obscure South Carolina company may be in line for millions of dollars in U.S. government funding to produce a coronavirus treatment after a former Republican senator with a financial stake in the business lobbied senior U.S. government officials, the Associated Press reports.

Plasma Technologies LLC, has received seed money to test a possible COVID-19-fighting blood plasma technology. But as much as $65 million more could be on the way, a windfall for the company that operates out of the founder’s luxury condo, according to internal government records and other documents obtained by the Associated Press.

The story of how a tiny business that exists only on paper has managed to snare so much top-level attention is emblematic of the Trump administration’s frenetic response to the coronavirus pandemic.

And it’s another in a series of contracts awarded despite concerns over their proposals voiced by government scientists. The others include a

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COVID start-up based in GOP donor’s condo could get millions from U.S.

An obscure South Carolina company may be in line for millions of dollars in U.S. government funding to produce a coronavirus treatment after a former Republican senator with a financial stake in the business lobbied senior U.S. government officials, the Associated Press reports.



Rick Santorum wearing a suit and tie: ap-16348667977848.jpg


© Seth Wenig, AP
ap-16348667977848.jpg

Plasma Technologies LLC, has received seed money to test a possible COVID-19-fighting blood plasma technology. But as much as $65 million more could be on the way, a windfall for the company that operates out of the founder’s luxury condo, according to internal government records and other documents obtained by the Associated Press.

“No COVID-19 tests were available”: Inside the country’s first COVID-19 outbreak

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The story of how a tiny business that exists only on paper has managed to snare so much top-level attention is emblematic of the Trump administration’s frenetic response to the coronavirus pandemic.

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GOP senator mispronounces Kamala Harris’ name at Trump rally

WASHINGTON – Republican Sen. David Perdue mocked Kamala Harris, his Senate colleague and the Democratic vice-presidential nominee, on Friday by repeatedly mispronouncing her name at a Georgia rally for President Donald Trump.

Perdue was wrapping up his remarks at an event in Macon when he referred to Harris as “KAH’-mah-lah? Kah-MAH’-lah? Kamala-mala-mala? I don’t know. Whatever.” The audience laughed.

A spokesperson for Perdue said the first-term senator “didn’t mean anything by it.”

Harris’ political opponents have repeatedly mispronounced her name since she became the first Black woman and first person of South Asian descent on a national ticket. Democrats say the mispronunciations smack of racism. Her first name is pronounced “KAH’-mah-lah” — or, as she explains in her biography, “‘comma-la,’ like the punctuation mark.“

Trump and Vice-President Mike Pence are among the top Republicans who have repeatedly mispronounced it. A few Democrats, including former President Barack Obama, have said it

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Commission orders Nebraska GOP to stop contractor’s robocalls | Articles

LINCOLN — The Nebraska Public Service Commission again ordered the Nebraska Republican Party to stop contracting with a Missouri company to place robocalls in the contentious District 1 legislative race.

State regulators Tuesday unanimously ratified the cease and-desist order against the Nebraska GOP and its auto-dialing contractor, Kansas City-based Remington Research Group, on Tuesday, one week after initially approving it.

The second vote was necessary because of an error in publishing the notice of the Oct. 7 meeting.

Earlier this month, District 1 legislative candidate Janet Palmtag filed a complaint claiming that a robocall placed by the Nebraska GOP falsely said Palmtag was lying about endorsements from several prominent Republicans, including former Gov. Dave Heineman and Rep. Jeff Fortenberry.

The state commission found that the robocalls placed on behalf of incumbent State Sen. Julie Slama — appointed in 2018 to the Legislature by Gov. Pete Ricketts —violated state law because

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