Black residents built Halyard Park. Now they fear being taxed out their homes as downtown development moves northward.

Lennie Mosley, president of the Halyard Park Neighborhood Association, first moved to the area with her husband in 1980.



Marjorie Johnson standing posing for the camera: Lennie Mosley stands outside her home, right, on North 5th Street in the Halyard Park neighborhood in Milwaukee. Mosley, who has lived in Halyard Park since 1980 and is president of the Halyard Park Neighborhood Association, thinks development is good, but she is worried about its effect on property taxes.


© Mike De Sisti / The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
Lennie Mosley stands outside her home, right, on North 5th Street in the Halyard Park neighborhood in Milwaukee. Mosley, who has lived in Halyard Park since 1980 and is president of the Halyard Park Neighborhood Association, thinks development is good, but she is worried about its effect on property taxes.

Back then, she said, few people wanted to live there. Now, the neighborhood’s location within walking distance of Fiserv Forum and related projects has put its housing in high demand and led to a sharp rise in property taxes.

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In recent decades, the adjacent Brewers Hill neighborhood experienced gentrification, with longtime residents pushed out as property values skyrocketed due to demand from wealthier buyers who moved in, resulting in higher

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