houses selling before they’re listed

South Florida single-family home sales are exploding over this time last year and local realtors say the COVID-19 pandemic has a lot to do with it.



a tall building in a city: This year has led to a real estate boom in South Florida. Why? Terri Parker explains.


© Provided by WPBF West Palm Beach
This year has led to a real estate boom in South Florida. Why? Terri Parker explains.

“We’re breaking records, the amount of sales are soaring,” said Tracy Ward of Douglas Elliman.

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Ward said they are seeing buyers from New York, New Jersey, California and other states hard hit by the virus and expecting more quarantines.

“A lot of the properties we looked at we blinked and they were gone,” said buyer Evan Jacobson from Northern Virginia.

Ward pointed to a house in Jupiter where they got a contract in less than a week — for more than $2 million.

“A lot of our properties are selling before we’ve even had

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These two homes were once among the oldest in D.C. They’re in Virginia now.

When we think of Colonial houses, we often think of brick, Georgian-style homes, fine frame mansions or porch-adorned plantations. That’s because those are the ones that tend to be preserved. And yet many Colonial homes must have been built with a mixture of determination and desperation: I need to get this house up pronto. My family needs a roof over its head and there are crops to plant.

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In recent weeks, Answer Man has been exploring old houses in the Washington of today. But what about old houses in yesterday’s Washington? You will remember that when the capital was created in 1800, it included the existing city of Alexandria and the adjacent land known today as Arlington County.

What are the oldest surviving houses in those places?

[Two old stone houses vie for the title of oldest dwelling in the District]

Well, let us go first to 5620

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As the second wave of COVID-19 tears through Connecticut, coronavirus deaths aren’t concentrated in nursing homes this time; they’re everywhere

Unlike in the spring, when the coronavirus killed thousands of residents in nursing homes, a much broader cross-section of the population in Connecticut is dying from COVID-19, a Courant review of death certificates from October shows.

Coronavirus claimed 35-year-old Pedro Alfaro Vargas, a stone mason from Norwalk, the youngest to die. A 66-year-old former tailor from West Hartford, a 60-year-old former emergency management director in Lisbon and a 43-year-old mother of three from Hartford were among those who died as the state’s death toll from COVID-19 began to climb once more.

The deaths were not confined to the elderly. While 115 deaths were among people 70 and older, there were 15 deaths of people between 60 and 69, eight of people in their 50s and one each in their 40s and 30s, state records show. As of Friday, 4,737 people had died in Connecticut during the pandemic.

The Courant reviewed

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As the second wave of COVID-19 tears through Connecticut, coronavirus deaths aren’t concentrated in nursing homes this time; they’re everywhere

HARTFORD, Conn. — Unlike in the spring, when the coronavirus killed thousands of residents in nursing homes, a much broader cross-section of the population in Connecticut is dying from COVID-19, a Courant review of death certificates from October shows.

Coronavirus claimed 35-year-old Pedro Alfaro Vargas, a stone mason from Norwalk, the youngest to die. A 66-year-old former tailor from West Hartford, a 60-year-old former emergency management director in Lisbon and a 43-year-old mother of three from Hartford were among those who died as the state’s death toll from COVID-19 began to climb once more.

The deaths were not confined to the elderly. While 115 deaths were among people 70 and older, there were 15 deaths of people between 60 and 69, eight of people in their 50s and one each in their 40s and 30s, state records show. As of Friday, 4,737 people had died in Connecticut during the

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More Ontario cottage owners say they’re victims of contractor who did time behind bars for fraud

David Baker and his wife Laurie had exciting plans for their retirement. 

In 2018, they planned to move out of the Toronto townhouse they’ve been renting and into the small cottage they own near Bancroft, Ont.

Two and a half years later, the cottage is an empty shell, the $44,000 they paid a contractor is gone and so is their dream.

“He took that away from us,” David Baker said. “It’s a nightmare.”

The Bakers have joined at least six other cottage owners CBC News has spoken to, who say they handed over tens of thousands of dollars to Scott “Scottie” Eisemann, 51, the owner of Cottage Life Construction. They accuse him of abandoning the projects he was paid to do.

Toronto Police Service

Eisemann, 51, is no stranger to these kinds of allegations.

In 2014, the contractor was sentenced to prison for defrauding an elderly Toronto woman out

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Condo renos must have documents proving they’re legal when selling the suite

I’m selling my renovated condo suite and I’m being asked by a buyer for permits and records of the work done. What should I do?

Renovations are a popular way to update a tired or dated property, whether for your own enjoyment or as a way to potentially add to a property’s resale value.

It is important to know that renovating a condo is much different from renovating a detached property. Notably, condo renovations must, in many cases, be approved by a condo’s board of directors and follow the condominium corporation’s bylaws, in addition to following the municipal bylaws and provincial codes.

As you note in your question, it is not uncommon for a buyer to include a clause in the proposed agreement (offer to purchase) that the seller of a renovated condo suite warrants that all renovations were completed with the permission and required approvals of the condo board.

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N.J. allows family visits in nursing homes, but some say they’re still banned from seeing loved ones

Frustrated that many nursing home operators appear to be ignoring a state memo in August permitting limited indoor visits, dozens of family members pleaded with the state Long-Term Care Ombudsman Wednesday night to help them end their loved ones’ isolation that began when the pandemic struck seven months ago.

Ombudsman Laurie Brewer, the state-appointed advocate for people in long-term care facilities, said she anticipates the state Department of Health will make an announcement soon that will broaden the terms of the plan it issued in August. She just doesn’t know when.

In the meantime, she encouraged families to continue appealing to state leaders, especially with the Thanksgiving, Christmas and Hanukkah holidays approaching and the threat of a second wave nearing with the colder weather driving everyone inside.

“I think it’s important that your voices be heard, with the regulators, the legislators, the executive branch. We can’t go back to a

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